How does a Virginia personal injury case end?

When you make the decision to pursue a Virginia personal injury case, you may not be overly clear on how it will end. Will you have to go to court and face a legal battle in front of a judge and jury? Will you be able to settle outside of the courtroom? You may be able to settle on your own, but seeking the best attorney isn’t going to hurt your case in any way.

How does a personal injury case end?

The majority of personal injury cases settle, meaning you will not have to go to court. So, let’s focus on how a settlement works with the insurer.

If you are able to reach a settlement with the insurance company, you will be required to sign a release. This release will state that you cannot come back to the insurance company later, even if you discover that your injuries were worse than you had originally thought. By signing this release, you will also be agreeing that you will not sue anyone else associated with the injury.

Once you sign the release and cash your check, the case will come to a close. Your personal injury attorney will make sure that your doctors have been paid and that all liens have been satisfied. Be careful though, the insurance adjuster may be doing everything in their power to make sure you collect nothing, or as little as possible. It’s their job to close your claim fast, and cheap – not focusing on what should be due your way.

Do I need a Virginia personal injury lawyer?

Not every Virginia personal injury claim requires the assistance of a lawyer. However, in some situations, dealing with the insurance company on your own is not a good idea. It doesn’t hurt to at least talk with a personal injury lawyer about your case.

You can order a FREE copy of our consumer guide, The Five Deadly Sins That Can Wreck Your Injury Claim, to learn more about personal injury claims in Virginia. 

If you have a question for Ben, you can submit it confidentially online at JustAskBenGlass.com.

Ben Glass
Ben Glass is a nationally recognized Virginia injury, medical malpractice, and long-term disability attorney